IMG_20190410_140239.jpg

Glitter sensory jars have been popular for several years now, but it is just recently that I saw them up close and personal at a local craft show. Now, I’m selling them at Clearway Speech! If you’re interested in buying them, please contact We Learn Multi-Sensory Play on Facebook (Etsy shop coming soon) or visit my clinic.

Parents and educators have a variety of uses for these sparkly jars. One teacher told me she uses them with her students for mindfulness, sensory needs, and emotion regulation. “Emotion regulation” is a term generally used to describe a person’s ability to effectively manage and respond to an emotional experience.

As a Speech-Language Pathologist, I was interested in including these jars in our speech practice. Here are some of my personal uses:

  • Turn taking and eye contact with toddlers - rolling the jar back and forth.

  • Learning pronouns ‘my’ and ‘your’.

  • Language expression skills - talking about what you see:

    • I see stars

    • I see sparkles

    • I see the colour blue and red etc.

  • Adding action words like “shake”, “look”, “see”, “roll”, “stand up”, “flip”, “falling”. Sometimes I will ask kids if they want me to ‘flip it’, ‘shake it’, or ‘roll it’.

  • As a reward or break after practicing something challenging in the session.

  • As a back up toy (I have it hidden in the corner of the therapy room in an easy-to-access location).

I recently used it with a child who got into his own routine; he’d look at it for about 10 seconds, allow me to take it away while he practiced language expression skills, then I’d return it for another short break. It has also been a motivating toy to look at after an activity that is less motivating (e.g. reading a challenging book for someone with Dyslexia). Overall, it’s surprising how useful this jar is for speech, language, and social-communication skills.

How do you use it? I’d love to hear your uses in the comments below. As always, share this article & enjoy your speech sessions!

Comment